Paint Your Landscape: Spring Bulbs

Posted April 12, 2013 in Plant and Tree

Planting flowering bulbs is a great way to make sure your garden comes to life in early spring. It’s pretty easy to do, and bulbs can keep flowering every spring for years to come. There’s lots of different bulbs to plant, but here are three of our favorite at MasterPlan Landscape Design & Installation:

Daffodils

Bright sunny yellow daffodils are a wonderful sign that spring has sprung! Plant the bulbs in the fall and they will bloom in late winter or early spring. Daffodils are hardy and easy to grow, and they resist most rodents.
The beautiful flowers have inspired poets, including William Wordsworth, who wrote in his poem, “Daffodils”:
“…And then my heart with pleasure fills,
And dances with the daffodils.”

Snowdrops

Petite snow drops with white flowers are among the earliest bloomers in the yard. They can bloom as early as February, and can even push up through the snow before it melts. Most pests, including rabbits, deer, chipmunks and mice, will leave them alone.
Like all most of us, poets are eager to greet spring after cold, dark winters, and have often celebrated Snowdrops. William Wordsworth called them the “venturous harbinger of Spring,” and Alfred Lord Tennyson dubbed them “February fair-maids.”

Hyacinths

Hyacinths are highly fragrant, bell-shaped flowers that come in shades of white, peach, orange, salmon, yellow, pink, red, purple, lavender and blue. They appear early in early spring. Some sensitive people are allergic to the bulbs, so it’s recommended to wear gloves when handling them, just in case.
An ancient Greek legend describes the origin of the Hyacinth: Two of the gods, Apollo and Zephyr, adored a handsome young Greek called Hyakinthos. As Apollo taught Hyakinthos how to throw a discus, Zephyr, the god of the west wind, became overwhelmed with jealousy and blew the discus back. It struck Hyakinthos on the head and killed him. From his blood grew a flower, which the sun god Apollo named after him. It is said Apollo cried, and his tears stained the flower’s petals.

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